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A Conversation with Peter A. Lawler (Part II)

April 12, 2010 • Posted in Medicine & Health
(first published on 17 September 2008 at http://bioethics.com/?p=5344)

Peter A. Lawler, Ph.D., is Dana Professor and Chair of the Department of Government and International Studies at Berry College, in Georgia, and a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics.

D. Joy Riley, M.D., M.A., is Executive Director of The Tennessee Center for Bioethics & Culture.

Riley: The subject is organ transplantation, and we have looked at the situation in the United States. Now let’s go beyond the borders of the US. There is certainly a market in a number of countries, one of which is India. There, often a donor (for lack of a ...read more

A Conversation with Peter A. Lawler (Part I)

April 12, 2010 • Posted in Medicine & Health
(first published 31 July 2008 at www.bioethics.com)

An Interview by D. Joy Riley, M.D., M.A.

Dr. Peter A. Lawler, Ph.D., is Dana Professor and Chair of the Department of Government and International Studies at Berry College, in Georgia, and a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics

D. Joy Riley: Today’s subject is organ transplantation. There are tens of thousands of people on the list in the United States, needing organ transplantation. This is an area of interest for you, I understand.

Peter A. Lawler: This is a tough issue. There are two ways of dealing with this: dialysis or transplantation. Dialysis is a horrible way to ...read more

Presuming Consent and More

April 12, 2010 • Posted in Medicine & Health

>(first published on 10 August 2007 at www.bioethics.com; used with permission)

A debate regarding organ donation is getting underway in the UK: it is a debate about “presumed consent.” Presumed consent means that although no permission form is signed, and there is no documented mandated discussion with anyone, a deceased person’s organs can be harvested by the state for transplantation. Another name for this is “opting out”: your organs will be harvested after death unless you have specifically requested that such not occur. The current laws in the UK are revisions of the Human Tissue Act in 1961, and are voluntary, or ...read more

Who Is Fit to Practice Medicine?

April 12, 2010 • Posted in Medicine & Health

First published 13 April 2009; reprinted here by the kind permission of www.bioethics.com (http://bioethics.com/author/jriley/)

Recently, I learned that Sweden is struggling with an important question: who should be trained as a physician? One particular student focuses this discussion. Karl Helge Hampus Svensson was banished a year ago from Sweden’s premier Karolinska Institute on the grounds that he had falsified high school records. Lying is not a noble activity for anyone, especially would-be physicians. Correction was necessary. Mr. Svensson was relieved of his medical student status. It was probably not the lying that caught the attention of the school officials, however. Mr. Svensson, ...read more

Aids in Africa: Treating the Patient

April 12, 2010 • Posted in Africa

R. Henry Williams, M.D., M.A., F.A.C.P. Board Chair The Tennessee Center for Bioethics & Culture April 2008

Travel to a third world country can challenge one’s perspective in a lot of areas.  Having just returned from Ethiopia, where my wife and I participated in an HIV-AIDS medical project, I have some new bioethics categories to process.

The AIDS Care and Treatment (ACT) Project in Addis Ababa is a comprehensive support ministry to HIV-positive beneficiaries and their families.  Thanks to international funding programs, people with AIDS are being given anti-retroviral drugs through state-run clinics, and they are referred to the Project for assistance in ...read more